Causeway Coast

Our seas are resilient, we have seen on social media how wildlife has flourished when we slow down, like the wildflowers blooming at the Giant’s Causeway. When we return to a ‘new normal’ we need to remember this and move forward in how we treat and respect our environment and the species that live here.

One of the best things about living in Northern Ireland is that you are never too far away from the seaside, and in my opinion, the Causeway coast is one of the most beautiful and diverse! It is not just my opinion either- the causeway coastal route is listed as one of the best drives in the world by Lonely planet! Sometimes we don’t always realise how stunning Northern Ireland is (the grass is always greener and all that), from the dramatic outline of fair head, to the carrick-a-rede rope bridge and the Giant’s Causeway or the shores of Dorne to the Kingsroad (if you are a Game of Throne’s fan!). Let me point out that as a UNESCO world heritage site, the Giant’s Causeway is on the same level as Yellowstone National Park and the Galapagos Islands!

Another reason why I love this coast is the diversity and abundance of marine megafauna! This week (25th May 2020), we were supposed to be out on the Celtic Mist surveying the North Coast for bottlenose dolphins! The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group alongside the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute (AFBI) have shown that this area of coast (from the Giant’s Causeway to Malin Head) is a potential hotspot for bottlenose dolphins in our waters! We have created a photo-identification catalogue of bottlenose dolphins (using unique markings on their dorsal fins) and it contains 54 well marked individual dolphins (there are more but their fins are too perfect to be able re-identify!). The North coast is a great place to try and spot some dolphins and porpoises as well as minke whales, basking sharks, if you are very lucky, humpback whales and even the odd sunfish! You never know what will show up- some of you might remember when a beluga whale appeared in 2015!

Bottlenose Dolphin Dorsal Fins – Various Contributors

I have many happy childhood memories of spending holidays in my grandparents caravan on the causeway coast where days were spent bodyboarding at the beach or walking along the cliff paths at the Giant’s Causeway and of course finished off with a trip to Barry’s! I still love going up to the coast and I can’t wait until we are allowed to travel again to visit. I remember last May day I was on Portstewart Strand and I was genuinely shocked at how much rubbish was blowing around – which ended in an impromptu beach clean! I urge people to look after our amazing coastline and our seas so future generations can enjoy it’s beauty and biodiversity like we do. Our seas are resilient, we have seen on social media how wildlife has flourished when we slow down, like the wildflowers blooming at the Giant’s Causeway. When we return to a ‘new normal’ we need to remember this and move forward in how we treat and respect our environment and the species that live here.

Giants Causeway Wildflowers – National Trust NI

Catherine Hinds – Northern Ireland Officer – Irish Whale and Dolphin Group

Strangford

Strangford Sunset – Rebecca Hunter

Strangford is a reminder that the recovery of our damaged natural areas can happen and, we believe, must happen to secure a healthy, wildlife-rich future for us all.  

Variety is the spice of life and it’s hard to find a place with more natural variety than under the waves and around the coasts of Northern Ireland. And nowhere does it better than Strangford Lough. I’ve been visiting the lough since I was six and my dad first took me across on the Strangford-Portaferry ferry. It’s a place I come back to often now for work, the rocky shore in front of Portaferry has some of the best rock pool life I’ve found locally – the last time I was there we recorded shannies, butterfish, juvenile brown crabs and lots of bright red beadlet anemones. 

The lough is well known as a jewel in the crown of Europe’s marine areas; and deservedly so. It’s the largest sea lough in the UK and boasts some of the fastest tidal streams in the world which fly through the mouth of the lough, creating a perfect home for filter feeding animals, like anemones, sponges and hydriods, which blanket the walls of Strangford’s narrows.

The Lough has a variety of personalities – its softer side is found at the northern end where it hosts some of the largest continuous mudflats in the UK, which provide ample feeding grounds for wading birds. Strangford actually supports over 80% of the global population of brent geese who come every winter to feed on the seagrass and green seaweed. 

Strangford (like all of us to be fair) has a bumpier side too. The countryside of County Down is marked by numerous hillocks, called drumlins, a leftover from the last ice age. These drumlins don’t stop at the shore but continue into the lough, creating the array of tiny islets that pepper the water’s surface – some say enough to number the days of the year. These unmanned areas also provide sanctuaries for the seals of Strangford – both the harbour seal and grey seal are found here. And if you’re lucky, you might ride the ferry alongside a group of bottlenose dolphins or spot a solitary harbour porpoise foraging by the coast. 

Strangford Lough also comes with some scars and plenty of baggage. Although it was protected in the 1990s for the wealth of wildlife found there, a lack of management left the seabed, and Strangford’s rare horse mussel reefs, badly damaged. But after years of work, the lough is finally beginning to show signs of recovery.

At difficult times like this, it can help to share stories of recovery. And while I can’t travel to Strangford at the minute, any areas of nature, wildlife and peace have been vital to my everyday life. When we begin to recover from the Covid-19 crisis, we will need to protect and restore our natural areas more than ever.  A recent report has highlighted that climate-friendly ‘green’ policy initiatives will help to address the ongoing climate and biodiversity crises, and could deliver the best economic returns for government spending. Strangford is a reminder that the recovery of our damaged natural areas can happen and, we believe, must happen to secure a healthy, wildlife-rich future for us all.  

Rebecca Hunter – Living Seas Manager – Ulster Wildlife